Dash Cam Laws By State in 2022: What’s Legal Where Your Fleet Operates?

Dash cam

When it comes to protecting your business's reputation, keeping your drivers safe, and avoiding fines you don't deserve, fleet dash cams are critical pieces of equipment. But there's also a cloud of confusion surrounding their legality: where can they be placed? Under what circumstances do they flout privacy laws? And are they even legal in the first place?

As the law differs state-by-state, we take you through every state and explain what the law says about dash cams there. And keep reading for our handy summary of the US laws, and our answers to the burning questions you're asking about using dash cams legally.

Dash Cam Laws By State

Alabama

Don’t obstruct the windshield, get consent before recording audio or on private property

In Alabama, it is perfectly legal to use dash cams. But there are a few rules to be aware of:

  • Your dash cams must not be mounted on the driver’s windshield, as it’s illegal to block any of the view.
  • You can record footage in public places, but it’s illegal to record footage while trespassing on private property. You should ask for consent before recording on private property.
  • If your dash cams record audio, you must get consent from everyone in the vehicle (including your employees and your customers) before recording their voices.
Did You Know?

Dash cam footage can be used as evidence in most courts across the US. If there’s evidence of a crime and a police officer, or someone involved in the case, subpoenas dash cam footage from you, you must provide it – if you refuse, or try to delete the video, you could face fines or even jail time.

However, there must be evidence of a crime. If there’s no reason to believe you've recorded one, law enforcement can’t insist on seeing your footage without a warrant. You should also know that police officers aren't allowed to ask to see your dash cam after pulling you over.

Alaska

Don’t obstruct the windshield, buy devices that are the right size

It’s legal to use dash cams in Alaska, but:

  • Your dash cams must be mounted in a position where they don’t obscure the view through the windshield.
  • If you’re going to mount your dash cams on the driver’s side, make sure you buy devices that are no bigger than five square inches. If you’re mounting them on the passenger side, they’ve got to be seven square inches or smaller.

Arizona

Buy devices that are the right size, and mount them in the right place

It’s legal to record with dash cams in Arizona, but you need to mount them in the right place.

Arizona law controls the extent to which drivers and vehicle owners are allowed to obstruct their windshields. If you’re setting up a dash cam on the driver’s side, it must sit in the lower corner of the windshield and take up no more than five square inches. If your dash cams are going to sit on the passenger side, they must sit in the lower corner and take up no more than seven square inches.


Arkansas

Don’t obstruct the windshield

In Arkansas, it’s legal to use dash cams, but it’s illegal to obstruct your windshield with any non-transparent objects (including dash cams!). You can’t mount your dash cam on the windshield, sidewings, or side or rear windows. Mounting your dash cams on dashboards or behind rear view mirrors is fine.


California

Buy cams that are the right size and mount them in the right place, get consent before recording audio

Dash cams have been legal in California since 2011. But there are some rules to comply with:

  • Dash cams must take up no more than five square inches of space if mounted on the upper center of the windshield, and no more than seven square inches of space if mounted in the lower right corner.
  • You can’t place your dash cams anywhere an airbag might deploy.
  • If your dash cams record audio, you must get consent from everyone in the vehicle (including your employees and your customers) before recording their voices.
Did You Know?

In some states, it's illegal to record audio conversations without the consent of every person involved in that conversation. In the context of dash cams, this means you can't allow your cams to record audio without getting permission from everyone sitting in the vehicle. These states are called all-party states.

In all other states, it's legal to record conversations as long as just one of the people involved in the conversation is aware and gives consent. This could be the person initiating the recording, but in the context of dash cams, is most likely to be your driver. These are known as one-party states.

Colorado

Don’t obstruct the windshield, don’t distract other drivers

In Colorado, it’s perfectly legal to use dash cams. However:

  • It’s illegal to mount a dash cam in any position where it would obstruct your driver’s view of the road. Behind the rear view mirror is usually a safe spot to put it.
  • Your dash cams can’t cause a danger or distraction to other drivers out on the road, namely by reflecting glare. So don’t buy dash cams that are coated in metallic paint, or have mirrored surfaces.

Connecticut

Don’t obstruct the windshield

It’s legal to drive with dash cams in Connecticut. The only law here concerns dash cam placement. Dash cams in Connecticut can’t be placed in a position where they obstruct the windshield. You could either place them on the dashboard, or behind the rear view mirror.


Delaware

Don’t obstruct the windshield, get consent before recording audio or on private property

Dash cams are legal in Delaware, but there are three dash cam laws to get familiar with:

  • You can’t obstruct your windshield with any non-transparent objects (including dash cams!). You can’t mount your dash cam on the windshield, sidewings, or side or rear windows. Mounting them on dashboards or behind rear view mirrors is fine.
  • You can record footage in public places, but it’s illegal to record footage while trespassing on private property. You should ask for consent before recording on private property.
  • If your dash cams record audio, you must get consent from everyone in the vehicle (including your employees and your customers) before recording their voices.

Florida

Don’t obstruct the windshield, get consent before recording audio

In Florida, it’s legal to use dash cams, but:

  • It’s illegal to drive a vehicle if something’s obstructing the view of the road – in other words, your dash cams must be mounted in a position where they don’t block the view out the windshield. Either on your dashboard or behind the rear view mirror is a safe place.
  • If your dash cams record audio, you must get consent from everyone in the vehicle (including your employees and your customers) before recording their voices.

Georgia

Don’t obstruct the windshield

It’s legal to use dash cams in Georgia, but you’ll need to place them correctly. Installing your dash cams on your drivers’ windshields is illegal, as it can obstruct their view of the road. Instead, mounting them on dashboards or behind rear view mirrors is a good call.


Hawaii

Buy cams that are the right size and mount them in the right place

In Hawaii, dash cams are legal, as long as you fit them in the right place:

  • Dash cams can be installed on the top or bottom corners of the windshield, and must not take up more than five square inches of space in those spots.
  • It’s also legal to install “non-obstructive” dash cams in more discreet spots, such as on the back window or above the dashboard.

Idaho

Don’t obstruct the windshield

Dash cams are legal in Idaho, but it’s illegal to obstruct your windshield with non-transparent objects – dash cams included! You can’t mount your dash cams on windshields, sidewings, or side or rear windows. Mount them on dashboards or behind rear view mirrors instead.


Illinois

Buy cams that are the right size and mount them in the right place, get consent before recording audio, don’t record police activity

In Illinois, using dash cams is legal, but there are three key laws to stick to:

  • Dash cams must be placed on the left-hand side of the vehicle dashboard, and cannot block more than five square inches of the windshield from view.
  • If your dash cams record audio, you must get consent from everyone in the vehicle (including your employees and your customers) before recording their voices.
  • Illinois has strict penalties for anyone caught recording police activity in public. This is something to be aware of when driving near police officers.

Indiana

Buy cams that are the right size and mount them in the right place

Dash cams are legal in Indiana, but they must be placed in the bottom corner of the windshield on the passenger side. They also can’t be any larger than four square inches.


Iowa

Don’t obstruct the windshield

In Iowa, it’s legal to use dash cams, but there is a (pretty vague) rule regarding where you can place them.

It’s illegal to drive a vehicle that doesn’t have “clear vision” through the windshield, side wings, or side or rear windows. While this isn’t very specific, your safest bet is to avoid mounting your dash cams on windshields in any spot where they block any of the view. We’d recommend placing them on dashboards, or behind rear view mirrors.


Kansas

Don’t obstruct the windshield

While dash cams are legal in Kansas, there’s a rule around their placement.

It’s illegal to “substantially obstruct” your windshield with non-transparent objects, such as dash cams. While it’s not clear what counts as a “substantial” obstruction, you should play it safe and avoid mounting your dash cams on windshields, sidewings, or side or rear windows. Try placing them on dashboards or behind rear view mirrors instead.


Kentucky

Don’t obstruct the windshield

It’s legal to use dash cams in Kentucky, but there is some hazy guidance around their placement.

It’s legal to install dash cams as long as they don’t obstruct your drivers’ vision through the windshield. To mitigate this risk, we recommend mounting your dash cams on the dashboard, or behind the rear view mirror, rather than on a clear part of the windshield.


Louisiana

Don’t obstruct the windshield

In Louisiana, it’s legal to use dash cams. But it’s illegal to drive a vehicle if there’s something obstructing the driver’s “clear view” through the windshield. Therefore, you shouldn’t mount your dash cams on your drivers’ windshields. Mounting them on your drivers’ dashboards or behind their rear view mirrors is a good bet.


Maine

Don’t obstruct the windshield

Dash cams are very much legal in Maine. But you’ll need to be careful where you place them:

  • It’s illegal to place a dash cam in such a way that it obstructs the “clear view” through the windshield, sidewings, or side or rear windows of a vehicle. To stay on the right side of the law, mount your cams on dashboards or behind rear view mirrors instead.
  • That said, this law does have an exemption for “required or provided equipment of the vehicle”, which could apply to dash cams if your vehicles are trucks. Ask your local law enforcement if you want to know whether you're exempt from this law.

Maryland

Mount your dash cams in the right place, get consent before recording audio

In Maryland, it’s legal to use dash cams as long as you follow a couple of rules, including some very specific guidance around where you can put your dash cams:

  • Dash cams must be installed above the AS-1 line of a vehicle’s windshield, or within five inches of the top of the windshield, and no lower. Alternatively, dash cams can be installed in the bottom corner of the windshield, as long as they fit within a seven-inch square.
  • If your dash cams record audio, you must get consent from everyone in the vehicle (including your employees and your customers) before recording their voices.

Massachusetts

Don’t obstruct the windshield, get consent before recording audio or on private property

Dash cams are legal in Massachusetts, but there are laws to be aware of:

  • It’s illegal to place a non-transparent object on the windshield, so mount your dash cams on the dashboard or behind the rear view mirror instead. If you’d rather, you can attach a side dash cam to your side windows, as long as it doesn’t reflect more than 35% of visible light. This, of course, is super difficult to measure by sight. We’d recommend speaking with your local law enforcement to make sense of whether you’re able to comply with this.
  • You can record events that take place in public places, but not those that happen on private property. You should ask for consent before recording on private property.
  • If your dash cams record audio, you must get consent from everyone in the vehicle (including your employees and your customers) before recording their voices.

Michigan

Don’t obstruct the windshield (unless your vehicles are exempt), get consent before recording audio

In Michigan, dash cams are legal, but:

  • It’s illegal to mount your dash cams on windshields as it can obstruct the driver’s view of the road, so fit them on dash cams or behind rear view mirrors instead.
  • That said, this law doesn’t apply to buses, truck tractors, or trucks that weigh over 10,000 pounds or carry hazardous waste. If you manage these kinds of vehicles, you can place your cams wherever you like!
  • If your dash cams record audio, you must get consent from everyone in the vehicle (including your employees and your customers) before recording their voices.

Minnesota

Mount your dash cams in the right place

Dash cams are legal in Minnesota, but you don’t have much choice over where you can mount them.

You can only fit your cams immediately behind, slightly above, or slightly below rear view mirrors. A dash cam mounted in any other position, including on the dashboard (which is a good spot in most other states!), is considered illegal.


Mississippi

Don’t obstruct the windshield

In Mississippi, it’s legal to use dash cams, but they can’t obstruct the driver’s view through the windshield, and so shouldn’t be mounted on the windshield. If your team drives in this state, the safest place to mount their dash cams is on their dashboards.


Missouri

Dash cams are legal in Missouri – in fact, it’s something of a rare beast: a state in which there are no laws to regulate dash cam placement or usage.

Although no one in this lawless land will tell you not to slap your cams in the middle of your windshields, we’d still recommend mounting them in spots where they’ll block as little of your drivers’ views as possible. Try mounting them on dashboards, or behind rear view mirrors, for safely unobstructed driving.


Montana

Don’t obstruct the windshield, get consent before recording audio or on private property

It’s legal to use dash cams in Montana, but there are rules to comply with:

  • Windshields need to stay completely unobstructed in Montana, so don’t mount your dash cams on windshields – even if your cams are transparent! On the dashboard is the safest spot for them in this state.
  • You can record footage in public places, but not on private property. You should ask for consent before recording on private property.
  • If your dash cams record audio, you must make sure everyone in your vehicle is aware they’re being recorded. It’s legal to record conversations without consent, as long as it’s not done covertly.
Dashboard-mounted dash cam
An example of a dashboard-mounted dash cam (though, obviously, your camera will need to face the other way!)

Nebraska

Don’t obstruct the windshield, get consent before recording audio

Dash cams are legal in Nebraska, but:

  • You can't mount your dash cams directly on windshields, as this can obstruct the driver's view of the road. Instead, the safest place to install them in Nebraska is on the dashboard.
  • If your dash cams record audio, you must get consent from everyone in the vehicle (including your employees and your customers) before recording their voices.

Nevada

Mount your dash cams in the right place

In Nevada, it's legal to use dash cams, but only if you install them in a specific spot – either the bottom corner of the windshield on the passenger side, or anywhere on your dashboard.


New Hampshire

Don’t obstruct the windshield, get consent before recording audio

Dash cams are legal in New Hampshire, but there are a couple of regulations to know:

  • It's illegal to mount your dash cams on your vehicles' front windshields, so opt for installing them on the dashboard instead. However, you are allowed to install rear-view and interior-facing cams. Regulation also stipulates that your driver should be able to see the dash cam's screen.
  • If your dash cams record audio, you must get consent from everyone in the vehicle (including your employees and your customers) before recording their voices. Recording without consent is just considered a misdemeanour, rather than a felony, if the driver’s involved in the conversation, or you have prior consent from one of the parties from a previous trip – but it’s better to be safe than sorry and ask for consent every time.

New Jersey

Don’t obstruct the windshield

It's legal to use dash cams in New Jersey, but they must be installed in the right place. It's illegal for any non-transparent object to be mounted on the windshield or on the driver or passenger side window. In New Jersey, the safest place to mount your dash cams is near the windshield, on the dashboard on the passenger side.


New Mexico

Don’t obstruct the windshield or other windows

Dash cams are legal in New Mexico, but you must think carefully about where you install them. It's illegal to mount a non-transparent object on the windshield, on the passenger and driver side windows, and on the rear window, if that's used for driving visibility. We recommend installing your dash cams on your vehicles' dashboards.


New York

Don’t obstruct the windshield

It's legal to use dash cams in New York – in fact, the state actively encourages all drivers to do so.

However, you must be sure to install your cams in the right place. Obstructing your drivers' windshields is illegal, so we recommend installing your dash cams on dashboards instead.


North Carolina

Like Missouri, North Carolina goes against the grain: dash cams are legal, but it has no laws to regulate their placement or usage.

That said, instead of sticking your dash cams front and center of your windshields, we’d recommend keeping safety in mind. Install them in spots where they won’t obstruct your driver’s view – such as on the dashboard, or behind the rear view mirror.


North Dakota

Don’t obstruct the windshield

In North Dakota, it's legal to use dash cams, as long as you install them in a safe place.

Windshields in this state need to be kept clear of everything from stickers and posters to dash cams. So avoid mounting yours on your team's windshields, and mount them on dashboards instead.


Ohio

Don’t obstruct the windshield

Dash cams are legal in Ohio, but it's illegal to mount them on your drivers' windshields. Stick to installing them on dashboards, or anywhere else in the car.

Interestingly, Ohio law states that it's legal to record video and audio in the cab, so long as the dash cam doesn't obscure any of the windshield.


Oklahoma

Don’t obstruct the windshield

In Oklahoma, it's legal to use dash cams as long as they aren't mounted on the driver's windshield. Installing them on your drivers' dashboards – and making sure they don't obscure any part of the windshield – is a safe bet.


Oregon

Don’t obstruct the windshield, get consent before recording audio

Dash cams are legal in Oregon, but there are a couple of rules to be aware of:

  • It's illegal install your dash cams up on windshields or windows, as the law prohibits “any material that prevents or impairs the ability to see into or out of the vehicle”. Mounting your cams on your drivers' dashboards is the best thing to do in Oregon.
  • If your dash cams record audio, you must get consent from everyone in the vehicle (including your employees and your customers) before recording their voices.

Pennsylvania

Don’t obstruct the windshield, don't use distracting screens, get consent before recording audio

It's legal for your business to use dash cams in Pennsylvania, but there are laws to get familiar with:

  • It's illegal to mount your dash cams on your drivers' windows or windshields, so stick to installing them on dashboards.
  • Dash cams screens shouldn't distract your drivers, so invest in devices that don't have screens, or have screens that can be put to sleep.
  • If your dash cams record audio, you must get consent from everyone in the vehicle (including your employees and your customers) before recording their voices.

Rhode Island

Don’t obstruct the windshield

In Rhode Island, it's legal to use dash cams, but it's illegal to mount them on your drivers' windshields, as nothing should obstruct the view through them. The dashboard is the safest place to install your dash cams in the Ocean State.


South Carolina

Don’t obstruct the windshield

Dash cams are legal in South Carolina, but they must be mounted on your drivers' dashboards, and not their windshields or windows. South Carolina law says that drivers should be able to see out of any window “without straining”, so keep this in mind when placing your cams.


South Dakota

Don’t obstruct the windshield or other windows, get consent before recording audio

In South Dakota, it's legal for you to use dash cams, but there are laws to know:

  • It's illegal to mount your dash cams on your drivers' front windshields, side wings, or side or rear windows, so stick to installing them on their dashboards.
  • If your dash cams record audio, you must get consent from everyone in the vehicle (including your employees and your customers) before recording their voices.

Tennessee

Don’t obstruct the windshield

Dash cams are legal in Tennessee, but you shouldn't install them on your drivers' windshields, as it's illegal to obstruct them. Mount them on your vehicles' dashboards instead for safer driving.


Texas

Don’t obstruct the windshield or other windows, don't impede the airbags

It's legal to use dash cams in Texas, as long as they're installed in the right place:

  • In Texas law, it's an offence to drive a vehicle “that has an object or material that is placed on or attached to the windshield or side or rear window and that obstructs or reduces the operator’s clear view.”
  • It's fine to mount your dash cams on your vehicles' dashboards in Texas, as long as they don't impede the airbags.

Utah

Buy devices that are the right size, and mount them in the right place

In Utah, dash cams are legal… depending on where you install them. Unlike many other states, in Utah it's legal to mount your dash cams on your drivers' windshields.

They can be installed along the top of the windshield, as long as they don't extend down further than four inches, or in the driver's side corner, as long as they don't take up more than four inches here. It's also legal to install cams on dashboards or rear windows.


Vermont

Buy devices that are the right size, and mount them in the right place

It's legal to use dash cams in Vermont, but you must install them in the right place. You can mount them on the lower passenger side corner of your drivers' windshields, as long as they're no larger than four inches tall and 12 inches long.

Alternatively, you can mount them on the upper driver side corner of the windshield, as long as they're no larger than two inches high and two and a half inches long.


Virginia

Don’t obstruct the windshield or rear window

In Virginia, dash cams are legal, but it's illegal to mount them on your drivers' front windshields or rear windows. Instead, you should mount them on your vehicles' dashboards, but just make sure they don't obstruct the driver's view of the road at all.


Washington

Don’t obstruct the windshield, get consent before recording audio

It's legal to use dash cams in Washington, but there are a couple of laws to get familiar with:

  • It's illegal to mount your dash cams on your drivers' windshields as they could obstruct the view of the road, so install them on their dashboards instead.
  • If your dash cams record audio, you must get consent from everyone in the vehicle (including your employees and your customers) before recording their voices.

West Virginia

Don’t obstruct the windshield

Dash cams are legal in West Virginia, but it's illegal to have anything non-transparent mounted on your vehicles' front windshields, dash cams included. Make sure you mount them on your vehicles' dashboards, out of the line of sight of your drivers.


Wisconsin

Mount your dash cams in the right place

In Wisconsin it's legal to use dash cams, but you've got to be careful about where you install them. It's illegal to mount them on the windshield, unless you put them behind the rear view mirror. They also need to stay clear of the sweep of your vehicles' windshield wipers. It's worth considering mounting them on your vehicles' dashboards instead, to stay on the safe side.

Dash cam mounted behind the rear view mirror
An example of a dash cam mounted behind the vehicle's rear view mirror

Wyoming

Don’t obstruct the windshield

Dash cams are legal in Wyoming, as long as they don't obstruct your drivers' views through their windshields. So, don't mount your dash cams on your vehicles' windshields: stick to installing them on dashboards instead.

Summary: Dash Cam Laws Across the US

When working out what's legal and what isn't in your state, you can cover all bases by asking the following questions:

  1. Where am I allowed to mount my dash cams?
  2. What size do my dash cams need to be?
  3. Is it legal to record audio without the consent of every person present?
  4. Is it legal to record footage on private property?

You'll find that every state bar two (Missouri and North Carolina, to be precise) has some kind of law that dictates where you can mount your dash cams. It's just a case of clarifying whether or not you're allowed to mount them on your vehicles' windshields.

If you are, it's likely there'll be restrictions in place that dictate the size and exact placement of your cams, aiming to make sure your dash cams don't impede your drivers' view of the road too obtrusively. If you aren't, you should look into getting dash cams that can be mounted on your dashboards, as they come with different fixings. Customer reviews and our own guide to the best dash cams for fleets should help you find the right model for your team.

Finally, you need to be aware of whether or not your business operates in an all-party consent state. If so, you'll need to get consent from all the people in each vehicle before enabling your dash cams to record audio. It's probably easier just to disable your audio recording function!

FAQs

Can you be prosecuted from a dash cam?
You can't be prosecuted for having and using a dash cam – in fact, many states encourage all their drivers to get one. What you can get prosecuted for is disobeying the state-specific laws we've laid out in this article.

It's also worth knowing that dash cam footage has the power to lead to legal action. Dash cam footage is admissible in courts across the US; after all, it shows very clearly how an incident or a crime went down, and if it shows you're at fault, you could face fines.

Are dash cams an invasion of privacy?
If they're used legally, then no, dash cams are not an invasion of privacy. They record events that happen out in public, that could be visible to anyone.

However, dash cams could be considered an invasion of privacy if you use them to capture video on private property, or to record conversations in the vehicle without the right level of awareness and consent from everyone. You should make sure you're familiar with your state's laws around these two potential pitfalls, but in general, you'll avoid privacy issues if you avoid recording audio and recording on private property.

Do you have to declare a dash cam?
You should always make sure your company's drivers know that you've got dash cams installed. Of course, they'll probably spot them as soon as they get into their vehicle, but you need to make it part of your driver onboarding process to explain that dash cams are in place, and explain why they're there.

Other than that, it depends on which state your team drives in. If your state's law requires you get consent from all passengers before recording audio, then those passengers will need to be told there's a dash cam in the vehicle (unless you simply disable the audio recording function).

Is it illegal to delete dash cam footage?
That depends – have you caught a road incident, or a potential crime, on camera? If so, you should keep hold of the footage in case it needs to be used in court. Remember, if an official subpoenas your dash cam footage and you respond by deleting it, that's going to land you in hot water.

On the other hand, if your footage shows nothing more than peaceful, legal driving, it's perfectly acceptable to delete it. After all, you don't need it taking up storage space on your memory card or cloud storage system.

How can I make sure my dash cams don’t record audio without consent?
If your business operates in an all-party consent state (which means it's illegal to record conversations unless everyone involved knows about it and gives their permission), there are a couple of things you can do to make sure you don't record anything illegally:

  • Place a warning sticker in every vehicle, which states that audio-recording dash cams are in use
  • Have your drivers inform everyone they drive with that they're using a dash cam that can record audio, and ask if that's okay. If their passenger says no, have them turn the audio recording function off
  • Disable the audio recording function on all your dash cams, and just never use it (this is probably the best option – after all, you don't need audio recordings to see what's happened on the road)
Where should I place my dash cams?
That depends on which state your drivers operate in. Scroll up to the states relevant to you to find out what the law says about dash cam placement!

Overall, though, installing your dash cams on your vehicles' dashboards – in a spot where they don't obstruct the driver's view – is the safest thing to do. No states have laws against mounting your dash cams there.

What should I do if my drivers travel through different states?
Firstly, we'd advise you to make sure you understand all the laws in each state where your drivers are active.

It's obviously possible for your drivers to adhere to different laws while driving in different states – for example, moving their dash cams around, or switching audio recording on and off.

However, it'll be much less complicated if you just aim to adhere to as many of the relevant laws as possible all the time. Mount your dash cams on your vehicles' dashboards, disable audio recording (or ensure your drivers get consent to record audio from their passengers all the time), and avoid recording on private property at all times. That way, fewer mistakes are going to be made.

What should I do if I don’t know whether I’m using my dash cam legally?
If you're still not sure whether you've got everything right, you should absolutely contact your local law enforcement office to ask them for their advice. It's better to ask questions now than to find out you've been doing something wrong down the line.
Julia Watts Content Manager

Specialising in the complex realms of telephone systems, business energy, vehicle tracking, asset tracking, and fuel cards, Julia writes content that cuts through the noise to help you find the right solutions and technologies for your business. Having spent five years working across the dynamic world of entrepreneurship, she loves helping exciting ventures – big or small – to flourish.